09 May 2016
Uncategorized

I recently turned 30. For some very odd reason I’ve not warmed to the idea of it just yet. However as I began to evaluate my 20s I realised how many mistakes I’ve made and things I’ve learned in a decade of life.

I took some time to write myself some advice.

1. Travel

You have very little responsibility so go and travel. When you get to 30, you’re going to want to travel slightly differently, spend a little more, do slightly more expensive things, eat at slightly better restaurants. So work for a year and save enough money to experience the world on the cheap.

How do you know what you want to do if you don’t know what’s out there to do?

      Don’t just travel to the obvious places.

 

      Travel to the tough places.

 

      Travel to learn.

 

      Travel to discover.

 

    Travel to the places that will challenge who you think you want to be.

2. Build things

Don’t spend too much time working on other people’s visions or in other people’s meetings. Spend time figuring out what your own world view is (see point 1) and where you want to take your own life.

Meetings are where ideas go to die.

If you find yourself in a corporate job that you wish you could leave then do it. Leave. If you don’t have a corporate job yet see point 5.

3. Read

Read every day. Read everything you can. Don’t just read about things you know about. Read about people. Read people.

4. Stop watching television

Right now. Stop it. It’s not helping you get better at anything.

5. Career

Do not take that corporate job. Just don’t do it (see point 2).

6. Trust

Even if it kills your relationships. Even if it destroys your ideas. Even if you lose your friends. Even if it means you end up getting hurt.

Trust people until they give you a reason not to.

But don’t be naïve. Some people are out to fuck you.

7. People

People are the best and worst thing that will happen to you. Some will help you go further, faster. Others will pull you down to their level and help you lose. Most are OK. Many are average. Some are excellent.

A few people will change your life forever. Find them.

You don’t need a lot of friends or people around you. You need amazing people who do for you as you do for them.

It’s simple really, a lot of average friends will leave you feeling alone when you need to feel surrounded by people who care.

8. Value time

Don’t waste time on people who you don’t trust. Don’t waste time with lovers who cheat on you. Don’t waste time with friends who don’t treat you the way you treat them (see point 7).

Do not be late.

Value other people’s time. That means that if you’re late, you don’t give a shit about them or their time and that you think you’re worth more and therefore can keep them waiting.

Some people will tell you that it’s OK to be late. It’s not. Some people will tell you that it’s just the way they are. Then you need to reevaluate them (see point 7 above).

9. Fail

Fail a lot. Fail often. Fail at love. Fail at sex. Fail at socialising. Fail at making friends. Fail at work. Fail at business. Fail with family. Fail with existing friends.

Fail. But do it quickly and learn a lesson.

If you don’t learn something every time you fail then all you’ve done is failed. If you learn something, then you’ve grown. Every time you grow and learn and fail, you get better at figuring out how the hell to succeed.

10. Success

There is no point at which you will have succeeded. Not in your twenties. Not ever.

Get over that fact and start building things (see point 2 and combine with point 9).

11. Patience

Be patient. Nothing worth doing is worth doing quickly. Nothing worth building is worth building in a rush. Nothing of value is formed in a minute.

Plan in decades. Think in years. Work in months. Live in days.

Originally published here.

22 Apr 2016
Uncategorized

Create interactive architecture visualizations in Unreal Engine 4.

Check Evermotion Archinteriors for Unreal Engine.

This tutorial was brought to you by UE4Arch: http://ue4arch.com.

Introducing Unreal Engine 4 for Archviz
In the architecture visualization world we always seek to achieve a result close to reality to provide our customers the feeling of seeing the finished project. But generally we are limited to still images and videos of these environments. What if we could enter the rooms, open the doors, walk on it, turn on and off lights, change the decor and still maintain photorealism?

Example of a interior walkthrough:

Example of exterior navigation:

That’s where Unreal Engine 4 enters. UE4 was recently launched in March 2014 by Epic Games as a powerful tool for creating games. However, it is an application that can be very effective for architectural visualization. It still has some graphic limitations compared to conventional renders as V-Ray and Corona, but that does not prevent you from getting incredibly realistic results in real time.

Click on image to enlarge kitchen_01.JPG

Kitchen visualization in Unreal Engine 4

 

The Blueprint system for interactive archviz
In addition to the powerful graphics render, UE4 has a visual scripting system (called Blueprints) where you can create multiple interactions without writing a line of code. With the Blueprints system, you can perform actions such as lighting on/off switch, open and close doors, change object’s color and material, replace models in real time, change the time of the day, create defined camera tours and much more: the limit is your imagination. It is also possible to work with particles to create extremely realistic effects like fire, smoke and water. Resuming: it’s a games creation software that can work perfectly for architecture and allows you to give life to your project with the possibility to navigate and interact with it in real time; and you can still do all this with a graphic quality comparabled with other 3D renders.

Indirect Lighting in UE4
Indirect lighting is another strong point of UE4. The engine has an improved lighting system where you can reach a similar workflow to V-Ray using a skylight to simulate the lighting coming from the sky and a directional light to simulate the sun. Sometimes it is also recommended to use spotlights (which work in a similar way of V-Ray light planes) at some points to get better lighting.

What do I need to start?

  • First of all you need a good computer to run UE4 software. The recommended hardware by Epic Games is a Quad-Core processor 2.5Ghz or faster, 8GB of RAM and at least a GeForce GTX470 or AMD Radeon 6870HD Series, but we do recommend a better setup if you are planning to really work with UE4.
  • The second thing you need is an Unreal Engine 4 subscription. You can sign up and find more details on their website. The workflow to create an architectural project inside UE4 is based on modeling and texturing assets in a 3D software (3dsMax, May or other), import in UE4 and then set the scene. So, you will need a prepared model or a 3D software to create your model.

With this setup you are ready to start. Other applications may be needed for your project and i will talk about them later.

In this article I will explain the process to create a basic interior scene, but also i do recommend you to read the documentation on the official UE4 website. In this documentation you can learn basic stuff and get used to the software interface.

Preparing the assets in 3dsMax.
I will use 3dsMax to start my project, first modeling the static objects of architecture: floor, wal’ls, ceiling, etc. It is important to rename each object as they will be exported separately.

Texturing in 3ds Max
After modeling you should start the texturing process. All assets that will be prepared for UE4 should have open meshes and no overlapping faces. Then an extra UV channel should be created. The reason for this extra UV channel is because UE4 will use channel 1 as diffuse object texturing and channel 2 to bake the lightning map. If the faces are overlapping the lightmap will cause artifacts and will fail. In 3dsMax we can use the flatten-mapping method to open the mesh in primitive objects. This method works very well and is fast for this case. For more complex objects such as furniture, you should use other methods such as pelt mapping.

Exporting 3dsMax models to Unreal Engine 4
After you set the static objects, i recommend to export each object with their proper names. To export the models to Unreal Engine 4 you should use the FBX format.

Importing 3dsMax models to Unreal Engine 4
You can follow the tutorial from Epic official documentation below:

  • Click the NEW button in the Content Browser and choose Import. Navigate to and select the FBX file you want to import in the file browser opens que. Note: You may want to select FBX static meshes (*.fbx) in the dropdown to filter unwanted files
  • The imported path of the imported asset depends on the current location of the Content Browser while importing. Make sure to navigate to the folder Appropriate prior to performing the import. You may also drag the imported assets into the new folder once import is complete.
  • Choose the Appropriate settings in the Import dialog. The defaults should be sufficient in most cases. See the FBX Import Dialog section for complete details of all of the settings.
  • Click the button IMPORT to import the mesh (es). The Resulting mesh, material (s), and texture (s) will be displayed in the Content Browser if the process was successful.
  • Although textures and materials can be imported with a static mesh, only Color and Normal will automatically be connected (assuming the supported equipment was used in Max / Maya), Specular maps will be imported but not connected, other maps, like Ambient Occlusion map in the Diffuse slot of the Mayan material, would not be even imported; it is best to check your materials and connect any unconnected maps and check which maps did not import.
  • Simply double-click the new equipment and connect the available textures into Their Appropriate inputs. By viewing the imported mesh in the Static Mesh Editor and enabling the display of collision, you can determine that the process worked as expected. Alternatively, you can just click and drag an FBX file from Windows into the Content Browser and it will bring up the import dialog for you.The import steps list is from the official Epic Unreal Engine documentation.
  • It is important to organize your content browser folders with the correct names. In this case we use the name Static Architecture for our static objects.
  • After importing the files to the content browser go up to the top viewport and drag all models at once (use CTRL to select more than one object). This way you can import all objects to the scene in the correct position created on 3ds Max.
  • After setting up the first part of the scene in UE4, you should import other assets like doors, furniture, adornment, etc. For these assets we should align their pivot point to 0. This is because Unreal Engine recognizes the pivotal point in 0 and if your object was imported away from the origin, you will have difficult to handle it in UE4.
  • The next thing after importing the assets is to relocate them into the scene: within the Content Browser (Ctrl + E), we will adjust some settings for each object. In Lightmap Size option will be set the lightmap size of each object. The higher this value is, the longer is the lighting calculation time as well as the shadows, so I recommend using a value of 1024×1024 for extended objects (walls, floors, ceilings etc) and values between 128×128 to 512×512 for smaller objects (adornment, furniture etc). In this window we can also see the number of textures channels and view the UV mesh.

Click on image to enlarge ContentBrowser.jpg

Content browser

 

Setting up materials in Unreal Engine 4
When the materials window is opened, you will use similar concepts to conventional renders to represent the desired materials. You should use the Nodes concept, which will link parameters as Textures, Texture coordinates, normal maps, etc.

Click on image to enlarge Material.JPG

Material nodes

When importing a texture to UE4, we can drag it into the materials window and connect to the Diffuse parameter. We will do this for parameters such as specular, reflection and normal. I will not go further into the creation of realistic materials within UE4, but you can see good examples in our complete projects. Also there will be a video course about these in the near future.
To create normal maps into your textures I recommend using a Photoshop plugin from nVidia “NormalMapFilter”.

Setting up the Lighting in Unreal Engine 4

Click on image to enlarge PlaceLights.jpg

Placing lights

To begin this part, I recommend start testing the lighting only with part of the static architecture (walls, floor and ceiling): this way the lighting test time is reduced and when we insert the furniture, the lighting will be very polished.

Click on image to enlarge skylight.jpg

First insert a Skylight and start testing the intensity value. I suggest not to exaggerate this value to more than 2.

 

Click on image to enlarge Spotlight.jpg

To test the basic lighting click in Build > Lighting quality > High. Spotlight settings on the right.

 

Click on image to enlarge WorldSettings.jpg

In this demo scene i configured my Lightmass (engine used to calculate GI in UE4) with the above parameters.

 

After many tests we came to these values to get free illumination spots (splotches or flickers). But remember that each scene should have a particularity.

Post-Process

Click on image to enlarge Post.JPG

After figuring out the lighting and reaching the desirable effect, you will add a post-process volume where you will have more control on the visual of the scene. In this step you will be able to add Bloom and Vignette effects, control the Exhibition, Depth-of-field, color correction and more.

You can check everything in our complete projects and keep reading the Unreal documentation to experiment different settings. Thanks for reading! This tutorial was brought to you by UE4Arch: http://ue4arch.com.

Check Evermotion Archinteriors for Unreal Engine.

Originally published here.

22 Apr 2016
Uncategorized

In recent years, we’ve reached a point where visualizations have become all-prevalent in the architectural profession. Whether we like it or not, stylized imagery is seen as a commodity, and ultimately, renderings win competitions and commissions. Architects have become enamored with beautiful renderings because clients understand pictures better than plans, and yet, the tools used to produce these glitzy images are changing faster than our industry can keep up. But with technology constantly evolving, we may face a new wave of visualization techniques, as the same render engines used to produce the tantalizingly realistic visuals in movies and video games are, for the first time, easily within our reach.

The lines across industries are blurring and companies behind the rendering engines for the most popular video games are now marketing their software directly to architects. This year, the original developers of the game Gears of War have made their proprietary rendering software Unreal Engine 4 free to architects, and many other video game render engines are available for less than the cost of those used by architects. Founder Tim Sweeney believes that the world of visualization is changing, telling The Verge “We’re realizing now that Unreal Engine 4 is a common language between all these common fields.” Creating a common language between the presently disparate fields of architecture, film, and video games, for example, suggests that the industries themselves may begin to hybridize and learn from one another. For instance, video game developers may look to architects to understand how to construct 3D buildings, while architects may learn from the navigable virtual environment of video games in order to discover new means of representation. Add to this the fact that these software packages are capable of producing lifelike animated walkthroughs and we are left wondering, why is this not an industry standard? Read on after the break for the pros and cons of being an early adopter.

Pros:

1. Video Game Engines Offer Entirely New Presentation Possibilities

Until recently, it was extremely time consuming to produce animated walkthroughs with standard architectural software packages that, in the end, still appeared crude and lifeless, and professionals rarely employ this means of representation unless it is requested simply due to these difficulties. Drawings and static renderings often fail to capture the experiential and spatial qualities of a building, but imagine being able to walk through a design to explain its circulation, for example. Or, if the client is choosing between options for interior finishes, they may instantly see multiple options in real time and in varying lighting conditions to make a decision. This is where video game render engines can exhibit their strengths.

2. Your Competitors Are Naturally Slow Adopters

When compared to our younger counterparts in the technology sector, architects have always been somewhat resistant to change. Many offices were slow to adopt computer drafting in its infancy, and the analogue process of producing models and drawings is still an important tool in most workplaces and universities. Architects are forced to work in the physical world of structure and materials, as well as the theoretical realm of drawings and ideas, with the intermediary between these zones being computer modeling. Building Information Modeling in particular has had wide-reaching effects, allowing us to digitally catalog, analyze, and price every single component of buildings long before construction begins.But despite the availability of these incredible tools, many firms have been slow to adopt them and still rely primarily on 2D drawings. Thus, firms that take advantage of video game engines may have an edge on their competitors when it comes to producing convincing renderings. As evidenced by works produced by 3D visual artists in Unreal Engine 4, video game render engines are capable of revealing incredibly nuanced details of light and movement that elevate the experience of an architectural walkthrough. Additionally, these three-dimensional spatial experiences provide opportunities to comprehensively explain projects and understand the experience of a building before it is built.

3. Architects Can Now Use Video Game Engines for Free

Perhaps the most compelling reason to give video game rendering engines a try is that Unreal Engine 4 is absolutely free for architects. Previously requiring a $19.99 a month subscription fee, prices for Unreal Engine 4 were already significantly more affordable than many of the software packages used by architects, and since architects do not produce a commercial product by definition, this also means that the 5 percent royalty fee assessed to video game makers does not apply. Unreal Engine 4 makes it even easier for architects to embrace their software by incorporating training guides and a showcase of architectural visualizations on their website. As more architects begin using video game engines in their practices, it is likely that we will uncover additional resources and tips that are uniquely suited for creating compelling virtual spaces. Clearly, Unreal Engine 4 has assured that cost is no longer a prohibitive factor in obtaining the tools to produce high-end visuals, but the way these software packages become an integral part of our workflow could indeed be an obstacle.

Cons:

1. A Steep Learning Curve

As some professionals have struggled to adopt even the most basic digital 3D tools, it is easy to see why few have jumped at the opportunity to innovate across industry lines. Though perhaps we cannot be too harsh on firms for their technological illiteracy, as it requires a great deal of additional time and money to adjust to an entirely new workflow. Some forms of 3D rendering software will have a very steep learning curve for those who are used to working in 2D environments and it is not always viable to sacrifice billable hours to computer training.

2. Video Game Engines Complicate Your Workflow

Architecture visualization is still a multi-step process that often requires the use of more than one software package, exporting and importing various elements. This is also the case with Unreal Engine 4 and other render engines, which require one to import a finished 3D model from another program such as 3DS Max. Because architects can already produce visually stunning renderings through 3DS Max plug-ins like V-Ray, some may be hesitant to add more time to the rendering process by complicating it with a video game render engine.

3. Video Game Engines Were Not Made for Architecture

Others question the very intent of using software originally intended for video games because without the proper skillset, they could potentially produce very clear stylistic differences from architectural visualizations. Not surprisingly, some examples of architectural walkthroughs produced with these engines remind us of playing a video game. Determining whether or not this is a problem comes down to the much broader question of stylistic preferences and one’s motivations for creating a rendering. These tools are potentially a danger to architects because they allow us to produce awe-inspiring visuals that lack any real substance in terms of their architectonic, spatial or programmatic functions. In this way, the goals of architects are inherently different than those of video game designers who care primarily about creating a compelling experience as it exists on-screen.

At best, rendering offers us an opportunity to communicate the underlying phenomenological ideas behind a building and present the ideal qualities we aspire to evoke. However, as technology enables us to produces exceedingly realistic scenes, there is also the danger of getting lost in the image of a project rather than its reality. As beautiful as some of these visualizations can be, we have to question what draws us to particular images and evaluate them for the architectural narratives and design decisions they ought to convey.

In Conclusion

Representation is only a very small fraction of the effort that must go into designing a finished building, and oftentimes renderings are only one tool in an iterative design process that allows architects to evaluate spatial qualities and their impact. Larger firms have the resources to outsource presentation renderings to professionals, resulting in a higher quality product and freeing up time to spend on design rather than mere representation. For this reason, some firms may not desire to spend additional time or money on creating high-end visuals in-house and the question of what software to use becomes irrelevant. However, when one remembers that architectural walkthroughs could be used as a design tool to help clients visualize and make decisions about interior spaces, the question of whether or not to take advantage of them becomes more complicated.

As these software packages continue to advance, users can expect the interface to become increasingly intuitive, potentially reducing set-up time and making architectural walkthroughs a viable means of representation. However, for architects to gain from advancements in visualization technology and the eventual blurring of industry lines in these areas, we must first learn to approach rendering as a tool rather than an end in itself. The decision of whether not to explore these tools will depend on one’s individual needs and circumstances. By initially sacrificing time to learn and navigate these new ways of producing renderings, the quality of the final images could be substantially elevated and one may discover new benefits to using 3D environments throughout the design process. Ultimately, it is likely that future architecture software packages will allow us to take advantage of video game quality engines in an environment specifically tailored for the clear representation of architectural spaces. The question is, which architects will take the first steps?

All videos courtesy of Youtube user koooolalala, except for “Architecture Real-time” demonstration, courtesy of UE4 Architecture.

Originally published here.

30 Mar 2016
Uncategorized

Mutungo - 01

No matter what professional field you are in, inevitably you will be asked to provide or even justify the cost of your services. It can be difficult to give pricing while trying to make sure that what you are providing pricing for is what any competition is providing pricing for. In addition giving some context for your price and demonstrating that it is reasonable is often times necessary. If you are an architect practicing in Washington State you may show clients the published price surveys that would indicate where you where within the reported percentile and is a good litmus test of your fee structure compared to the rest of the market. In the architectural visualization profession there isn’t any “defacto” standard and many studios are good at the old “Bait and Switch” to lure you in. One resource is the 2009 CG architect survey and the information could be interpreted as follows:

In a 2009 worldwide survey, performed by CGarchitect (most influential and reputable online magazine/community focusing on architectural visualization), the average price charged for a high-quality 3D architectural still image is between $1000.00 USD and $2000.00 USD. This is an average price you could expect that paying in this range as being fair for small to medium projects, large projects range from $3,000.00 USD onward depending on the project. While standard 3D animation costs anywhere between US$5000.00 USD and $10000.00 USD , you could expect to pay a fair bit more depending on duration and complexity of video. Obviously, every studio is different and prices vary, but usually the studios that are producing higher quality work, are charging more. If you have worked with rendering studios you probably know you can get cheaper renderings from countries like China and India, downside can be the quality control and all the time spent managing the process to get the results you want. The comprehensive survey on the profession of architectural visualization can be found here:

http://www.cgarchitect.com/2009/11/cgarchitect-2009-industry-survey-results—spotlight-on-the-future-of-the-architectural-visualization-industry

There are some firm hard figures on the monetary level of what are going rates by regions and it gives you a good idea how much you may pay in currency, but I would argue that the cost of renderings is also measured in your time and quality of the end result.

Read more!

22 Nov 2015
Uncategorized

4

A condotel near the beach in Bali, eco-friendly commercial space in Dhaka and affordable luxury living in Addis Ababa. These are just some of the unique investment opportunities to be found in the emerging markets.

Global property portal Lamudi reveals noteworthy opportunities for international real estate investors outside of traditional investment locations.
Read more!

22 Nov 2015
Uncategorized

Taken from http://wetzelservices.com

In 2011, Night Rose Kalumba decided to leave her rented shop in Kiyembe, a city suburb where she was a tailor She had realised her business had started losing market as customers had stopped flooding in like it was the case before.
Kalumba then decided to focus her energies somewhere else. “I had half an acre of land in Kasubi on Hoima Road. By the time I left Kiyembe I had saved Shs10m so I resolved to use this money to build rentals.”
She resorted to building rentals because, “Building rentals is a Iong time investment that you will never regret. I built my houses with the intention of helping me to educate my children, pay my bills, and look after me in my old age which I have pretty well succeeded in. I now pay school fees for my grandchildren and have also built a tailoring shop although it is not well,” Kalumba explains.

Make your rentals profitable

The look of the house
Kalumba says the more you take good care of your rentals, the more people will yarn for them.
She adds that you need to always make sure that your houses are in good shape with proper services such as electricity and water.

Read more!

11 Aug 2015
Uncategorized

The 5 Best Productivity Apps for Entrepreneurs

Advanced technology has changed employees’ work habits, the management of their daily goals and the way they accomplish tasks. However, this progress has also brought increased workloads that require multitasking, which eventually may decrease effectiveness. So, how do entrepreneurs actually get any work done?

Fortunately, technology has made it easier for entrepreneurs to accomplish routine tasks, manage time more efficiently and keep track of responsibilities in a more orderly fashion.

Credit the gaggle of mobile productivity apps now available on the market. However, it’s important to know how to choose the right app for your work style. Below are some of the apps that do a good job helping you to avoid the distractions of everyday demands.

1. Evernote

Through Evernote’s web and mobile app, you can create digital notebooks for everything from keeping track of your expenses and managing your calendar, to creating slideshow presentations and planning your next trip. Whether it’s personal or business expenses, keeping track of receipts is impossible for even the most organized of people. By creating one of Evernote’s digital notebooks, you’re able to screen-shot your receipt right after payment, making it easier to locate expenses in the future.

The best way to use Evernote, though, is to take advantage of everything else it has to offer. The more notebooks you add, the more valuable the app becomes. Try taking snapshots of everything in your office and on your shelves, then insert it all into a notebook and relieve the stress of sorting through papers. All you have to do is tag the notes you’re taking for easy search access at a later date. It’s a game changer when you’re scrambling for those notes you quickly jotted down during your weekly meetings.

Read more!

03 Aug 2015
Uncategorized
30 Jul 2015
Uncategorized
Using only four materials — stone, wood, concrete and steel — Chris Corbett designed and built a new patio and deck for a backyard in Davis, California, that’s anything but basic. “My philosophy is to use natural, raw materials,” Corbett says. He focused on thoughtful, handcrafted details that not only make this backyard and patio design stand out, but also make it more livable and likely to thrive with little maintenance or attention for years to come.
03 Jun 2015
Uncategorized

The Milége World Music Festival is an annual music festival in its second year, which showcases Ugandan and African musical talent. This year was at the Entebbe Botanical Gardens, a wonderful venue with plenty of shade for the outdoor event. Featuring all kinds of traditional music in its various forms, the two-day camping festival was indeed a tribute to our musical heritage as a country and a continent.

This music festival started on Saturday the 22nd and went on up to Sunday the 23rd. Even though people were there by 2pm, the actual musical show did not start until late in the evening at 8pm. Nevertheless, the attendants were not left with no entertainment as there were games like chess, matatu, duulu, sack race, tug-of-war and kwepena, as well as other activities like sports (the football players did not seem to run out of steam), nature walks, art on exhibit and fashion stalls with African clothes and items to buy.

No wonder the Sunday event also started quite late, around 6pm after it had rained all morning and threatened to ruin the day. But Mother Nature came through with sunshine around midday and the preparations started for the evening jam session.
The camping grounds were quite removed from the main stage, so as to allow families that wanted to go to bed early to do so without much interference from the music. However, I assume only those with small children managed that as there was a lot of dancing and merry-making at the foot of the stage and anyone would feel like they were missing out if they didn’t join.

Milége Band, the main organisers of the festival, had a few guidelines that each performer should adhere to in order to be showcased during the weekend. The guidelines were:

  • All music should be traditional music, in its pure or fused form. Which meant that all the music should have local origins like kadongo kamu, or a style that is indigenous. No reggaeton, Gangnam style, hip-hop or any genre of music imported from other parts of the world.
  • All music has to be original. That meant that we had a whole weekend of no one doing covers and ruining someone else’s music. It was awesome, to say the least.
  • All the music had to be live, no playing CDs and singing over a recording. The better to show off talent. Personally, I feel like musicians who need to sing over their recorded music should not have the title of ‘musician’, but that’s my personal preference.
  • A very vital rule was that every performance had to be positive and family friendly, since there were lots of small children and families around. In fact, the festival was so child-friendly that there was a bouncing castle during the day.

The festival was not all about music though; there was space for poetry as well, besides all the games being played. I chanced upon the Lantern Meet of Poets doing their original poems around a campfire, reminiscent of the days of old when stories were passed down through oral tradition around a fire. The first day had a large crowd of between 150 and 200 people. The organisers were shocked by the number of tourists coming directly from the airport as one airport taxi after another kept offloading passengers way into the night. I guess its proximity to the airport made the festival the go-to place for someone landing in the country on a Saturday night and looking for something fun to do.

Even though it was a family event, there was free flowing alcohol and Sunday morning saw campers fighting off hangovers with local food prepared by the enterprising food vendors.

Even with a rule against musicians singing over recorded music, there was a Deejay for attendees who wanted to dance the night away. In between stage set-ups and guitar tunings, the deejay would keep us in the dancing mood with great Afro beats from all across the continent. If you are unaware, it’s impressive how great our original music is on its own and it left me wondering why we want to copy other cultures’ music and sing in patois. I guess this is why campers who decided to spend Saturday night on the camping grounds did not enter their tents until the wee hours of the morning just before the sun could peep out among the trees.

Milége World Music FestivalThe musical acts were so impressive that crowds did not want to leave, even those that had planned on driving back home ended up spending the night or leaving very late because they could not bear to miss a single performance. There were bands from all corners of Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, the greater Africa and even a performance from a Japanese duo. The lady is an honorary Kenyan though, and she sang in Jaluo and Kiswahili while playing the adungu, so that counts as East African music. There were dance performances from various cultures, which made the attendees get up and join in the dancing and made it one big dance party at the end of the day.

I unfortunately had to leave when the clock was showing close to 11pm on Sunday night but I left a whole lot of people, over 100 people, still revelling in the music. There was also another stage being set up, I assume for later on in the night after some people had gone home. The entire festival was run with such a laissez-faire attitude where people were allowed to choose whether they wanted to get involved in the games, listen to the bands playing, or simply sleep in their tent all day. The organisers were very attentive, however and even without my ‘press pass’ tag, they made sure I was well taken care of and comfortable at the festival. How I wish there was a day after the weekend to rest from all such exciting weekends!

Event: Milége World Music Festival
Location: Entebbe Botanical Gardens
Organised By: Milége Band

Originally posted here: A Musical Weekend at Milége World Music Festival

03 Jun 2015
Uncategorized

Past Fort Portal, under the shadow of the Virunga Mountains, we followed the signs for Semliki National park so we could find the lodge. In spite of the fact that we wandered around for about an hour the good people of the area were kind enough to keep setting us back on our path. At around 2:30 pm we drove into Semliki Safari Lodge. At first sight we noticed that all the buildings and chalets were covered with grass thatched roofing and open view architectural work. We found out later that it’s the local people in the area who helped to collect the materials for construction.

Read more!

08 May 2015
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Young-man-walking

When I dropped out of school at 19 to start my first job in Hollywood, I didn’t know anything and I had no idea where I’d end up. Thankfully, I was attached to some smart and forgiving people who let me learn under them. I suppose I also had good instincts. Within a few short years, I’d become a bestselling author, the director of marketing for a publicly traded company and got to work on a ton of cool projects. I’ve hired my fair share of people now (fired them too) and having been through the ringer of young-person-just-starting-out-in-a-new-field close to a half dozen times, I figure I know it well enough to talk about it.

It goes like this: You’re scared but overconfident, clueless but eager to learn, just glad to be given a shot and you don’t want to screw it up. I tried to think of a few things I wish I’d been told when I was just starting, things that would have saved me some tough lessons. These are the things I still tell myself.

They are:

-Calm down.

-Assess the terrain. Sit there and observe. Figure out who the dominant personality types are, what makes them tick and how things really work. Don’t act, don’t give your opinion, don’t do anything until this has been done. When you understand the people, politics and the business (eg, the terrain) then you can begin to get to work.

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22 Apr 2015
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With lifestyles and professional demands continually evolving, owning or living in a home as a long-term proposition is becoming less of a priority for many. This may seem to make owning or planning for a dream garden difficult and, for renters, not a wise investment.For those of you with a small outdoor space to plan for, there are many great design ideas and products that can allow you to design and create your own private dream garden that can move with you if required. That includes feature plants and pots, water features, screens, furniture and even garden walls. In fact, smaller courtyard spaces can be almost fully transportable apart from the floor surface and some larger, established trees.

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20 Apr 2015
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Dry, sunny and wind-swept places in the garden often pose a challenge for the home gardener. But extra watering to keep plants alive in those places is a waste of your time and resources. Beyond planting drought-tolerant plants, I also encourage you to think about how you can design a space that takes advantage of full sun.
01 Apr 2015
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Reclaimed wood has never been more popular, making its way from basement bars all the way up to elegant master bathrooms. Used on flooring, vanities, accent walls, mirror frames and even tub surrounds, this material adds warmth and rich texture. It’s also a wonderful contrast to the usual bathroom materials, such as glass, granite, marble and tile, which can leave a space feeling cold. “Reclaimed wood can be a once-in-a-lifetime gift,” says Nathan Daves, of Restoring Texas. But using it in a room full of potential splashes and steam takes some extra consideration. “At the end of the day, water is the evil kryptonite for wood,” Daves says.Daves also warns that not all reclaimed wood is created equal. A broken-up pallet will not withstand moisture at all like old-growth pine lumber harvested from a pre-1940s barn, for example. Other good choices for moisture resistance are reclaimed teak and old-growth cypress. Whichever wood you use and wherever you decide to use it, check out this list of ideas and advice to see if reclaimed wood will suit your bathroom.
22 Mar 2015
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here was a time when no self-respecting rendering would allow itself to be seen in public without a zeppelin hovering somewhere in its desaturated sky. Supermodels in haute couture garments strutted across opera foyers, uninterested expressions and blasé attitudes adding to the exclusivity of the space. These gimmicks are still widely used, but since its early days architectural rendering has seen major technical advancements that allowed it to appropriate cinematic techniques relying on color, lighting, framing, composition, and angles to convey moods. This disciplinary overlap between architecture and film is fundamental in the use of similar software and modeling techniques and has brought the two closer through the idea of storytelling, a notion inherent to both disciplines. In architectural rendering, if the spirit or the main feeling isn’t persuasive and engaging enough, the function of images is reduced to regurgitating information already provided through drawings and schematics.

An overabundance of visual content, brought on partly by the democratization of architectural publishing, has produced an almost pornographic fixation on architectural representation, rendering techniques in particular. Computer generated imagery is no longer an intermediary between an idea and its realization, but a finished product on its own. Different rendering genres have emerged over the years, similar in approach and style to recognizable cinematic tropes.

The Mad Max

City lights dimmed, the “urban wasteland” awaits the appearance of the new development whose lights seem to be the only sign of life for miles around.

Eleftheria Square by Zaha Hadid Architects, via Skyscrapercity (See also: Zaha Hadid on Artsy)

Phoenix Towers by Chetwoods Architects

The Whodunit

These renderings sport a menacing atmosphere achieved by desaturating the image or using only dark blue and green tones. Stormy skies, shadowy figures, and strong contrasts create tension that transforms spaces into potential film noir crime scenes.

Kaohsiung Port Terminal by RTA-Office

Park51 by Soma Architects

The David

The David flaunts its perfectly mapped textures, lifelike grass, and clinically precise reflections to the point that, like the android boy David in Spielberg’s A.I., the architecture looks a bit too perfect.

The Quest by Ström Architects

Paranormal Activity

Blended so well into their surroundings, these projects are practically not there. Buildings appear as dreamy echoes of themselves held up by light and memory, instead of concrete pillars and slabs.

Camellian Opera House by Matteo Cainer Architects

The Gondry

The stubborn collage technique may feel anachronistic but, every so often, it makes a powerful comeback. The combination of photos, renderings and drawing can be surprisingly effective and reminds of Michel Gondry’s distinctive visual style. In its most experimental form The Gondry may include unicorns, movie stars, space ships, and a cutout photo of Le Corbusier.

Boulders Resort by Diller Scofidio + Renfro

The Theodore

The Theodore could be a subcategory of Paranormal Activity, but, unlike the latter, it is found mostly among representations of interiors. Airy spaces and more than generous amounts of diffuse lighting make one want to lay back in an armchair and dictate a heartfelt love letter, just like Theodore in Spike Jonze’s “Her.”

Green Valley by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

The Katherine Heigl

Romantic snowbound streets, palpable silence of the first snow, kids having fun, couples holding hands, and a building in the background. The Katherine Heigl promises a happy ending and a lighthearthed story enacted in and around the omnipresent new building. This category includes sunsets, images whose large portions show meadows, forests, parks, and all kinds of pastoral scenery.

Le Brassus by BIG

Samaranch Memorial Museum by HAO Holm Architecture Office

Originally posted here.

22 Mar 2015
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Some Thoughts on Texture

A thought that is often running through my head when working on architectural illustrations is how can I bring more of a human touch to the image. The answer is almost always through texturing in Photoshop.
I have spent the last week illustrating an aerial perspective for my latest personal project. For this particular work, I wanted to hit almost every surface of the image with a strong texture to see what would happen. There were many areas that I would normally skip over in other illustrations but didn’t in this one. The result is an image with imperfections that shows age.
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22 Mar 2015
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Not the sexiest title for a blog post, I know. But as we’ve inhabited a variety of workplaces—including a garage in Menlo Park, a farmhouse in Denmark and an entire New York city block—we’ve learned something about what makes an office space great. And we’re excited to put that into practice, starting here at our home in Mountain View.

Today we’re submitting a plan to redevelop four sites—places where we already have offices but hope to significantly increase our square footage—to the Mountain View City Council. It’s the first time we’ll design and build offices from scratch and we hope these plans by Bjarke Ingels at BIG and Thomas Heatherwick at Heatherwick Studio will lead to a better way of working.

22 Mar 2015
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As an architect, what do you give the company that has everything? More to the point, what do you design for the company that is everywhere, that has become digitally ubiquitous?

If you’re Thomas Heatherwick and Bjarke Ingels, the rising-star architects tapped to design the new Google headquarters in Mountain View, you begin by covering all of your bases, philosophical, practical and technological.

The remarkably ambitious plans that Google released at the end of last week, for a hefty 3.4 million square feet of new office space distributed across four pieces of land between the 101 Freeway and the edge of San Francisco Bay, are communitarian, flexible, robotic and dipped in nostalgia all at the same time.

19 Jan 2015
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The important dream and desire of everyone, is to have their own customized home befitting their individual needs. A recently released housing survey by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics points at an improvement in housing, but states that there is still a gap to be filled if the majority of the poor are to fully realize this right. The survey indicates that Uganda has a housing deficit of 550,000 units. About 160,000 of this backlog is in urban areas. Kampala alone has a housing deficit of 100,000 units. Uganda’s population, which is growing at a rate of 3.3% per year, is projected to increase to 45 million by 2020. Read more!

19 Jan 2015
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The word itself explains its definition. It is a virtual moving computerized presentation of the project before its real execution. This service is a miracle for real estate developers, builders, property developer, industrialist, and visionary people. With the use of this service they are able to explain their dream project to their clients, investor, and bankers before its execution. Compared to main stream 3d animation, walk-though animation is cost effective & less time consuming. With the camera movement in the presentation process contain animations of the structure, its construction, vehicular and human movement along with planned fixtures due to this process the term animation is used with walkthrough. Read more!

19 Jan 2015
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As a client, how can you avoid paying for design work you don’t want? Making sure you know what you’re getting before you have it built helps.

Today there is no better way to understand and have a feel for new design than to see it in 3-D. Rather than your having rely on imagination to see if the bathroom door will be far enough away from the kitchen, 3-D allows you to virtually walk through your home before even approving any specs or designs. Want to see that living room wall with bay windows? No problem. Want to check out the view from the window? Step right up. Changed your mind and now want no windows? Hold on a sec.

3-D design has proven to be a fast and efficient way to get involved in every part of the design process. When architects actually design with you, the client — and present other, different or better options — you’ll be better equipped to make informed decisions on a design that’s perfect for you.  Read more!

18 Jan 2015
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The roof above your head – arguably our most important human possession, and yet how many of us know about proper construction and upkeep?

More homeowners are opting for modern architecture characterized by strong horizontal lines, large, expansive windows, and flat roofs. While visually striking, some homeowners have doubts about the flat roof’s ability to withstand harsh windy equatorial rainfall.

Just this past Christmas holiday, residents in Entebbe were woken from their sleep to the sound of loud bangs and shaking beneath their feet. What they were experiencing is called a “thunderstorm.” Tropical rainforest climates have no pronounced summer or winter; it is typically hot and wet throughout the year and rainfall is both heavy and frequent. Some homeowners with faulty or unreliable flat roofs may have heard the sound coming from above. Flat roofs can be susceptible to water collection that can gather and stagnate in water pools.

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